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Women and Girls in (Inter)National Politics: Citing in Chicago Notes

INTR 219/PSCI 219/AFR 217/WGSS 219/LEAD 219
Professor: Joy James
Fall 2020

About Chicago 17th ed.: Notes/Bibliography

The Chicago Manual of Style Notes/Bibliography system is used primarily by scholars in history, arts, and humanities. It is similar to Chicago Author-Date system, which is primarily used in the social sciences.

Chicago Notes/Bibliography style consists of two parts:

  1. A superscript number in the text and corresponding note
  2. A bibliography

Visit the libraries' guide on Citing Your Sources for more information about using Chicago Notes/Bibliography, including examples of completed citations for a variety of resource types.

How to Format Notes

For more detailed information see Chicago Manual of Style, 14.19.

A note consist of two parts:

  1. A superscripted note number (1) in the text, placed at the end of a sentence or clause
  2. A note containing the citation, placed either at the bottom of the page (footnote) or at the end of the paper (endnote).

General Formatting of Notes

  • List in order the author, title, and facts of publication
  • Author's names: write in standard order (e.g., Julia Alvarez)
  • Titles: capitalize in headline style (e.g., How the García Girls Lost Their Accents)
  • Books/Journal Titles: italicize (e.g., How the García Girls Lost Their Accents)
  • Article/Chapter Titles: enclose in quotation marks (e.g., "Black Twitter? Racial Hashtags, Networks and Contagion")
  • Separate elements with commas
  • Enclose facts of publication for books in parentheses
  • Abbreviate editor/edited by (ed.), translator/translated by (trans.), volume (vol.), edition (ed.)
Example

1. Julia Alvarez, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents (Chapel Hill, NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991), 17.

2. Sanjay Sharma, "Black Twitter? Racial Hashtags, Networks and Contagion," New Formations: A Journal of Culture/Theory/Politics 78 (2013): 51, https://doi.org/10.3898/NEWF.78.02.2013.

For additional examples, see the source types listed in the left navigation.


Citing the Same Source Again

For more detailed information see Chicago Manual of Style, 14.29-14.36

  • To cite the same source again, shorten the citation using the author's last name, a shortened title, and cited page(s).

    Example

    1. Julia Alvarez, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents (Chapel Hill, NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991), 17.

    2. Sanjay Sharma, "Black Twitter? Racial Hashtags, Networks and Contagion," New Formations: A Journal of Culture/Theory/Politics 78 (2013): 51. https://doi.org/10.3898/NEWF.78.02.2013.

    3. Alvarez, García Girls, 20-21.

    4. Sharma, "Black Twitter?," 57-58.

  • Chicago no longer recommends the use of ibid. When citing exactly the same single work as the previous note, use the shortened form, omitting the title of the work.

    Example

    1. Julia Alvarez, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents (Chapel Hill, NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991), 17.

    2. Alvarez, 20-21.

How to Format the Bibliography

General Formatting of the Bibliography Entries

For more detailed information see Chicago Manual of Style, 14.21; 14.61-14.99

Bibliography entries are formatted similarly to notes, with the following differences:

  • Authors: names are inverted (e.g. Alvarez, Julia)
  • Publication details: not enclosed in parentheses
  • Elements are separated by periods, not commas
  • "Edited by" and "Translated by" are written out, not abbreviated
  • Entries are arranged alphabetically by last name of the author.

Compare the bibliography and note forms for this book:

Bibliography:

Alvarez, Julia. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents. Chapel Hill, NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991.

Note:

1. Julia Alvarez, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents (Chapel Hill, NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1991), 17.

For additional examples, see the source types listed in the left navigation.


Order of the Bibliography Entries

  • Alphabetize the list by last name using the letter-by-letter system (e.g., Fernández would come before Fernán Gómez)
  • Single-authored works precedes multi-authored works beginning with the same name
  • Works by the same author are arranged alphabetically by title

Get Citation Help!

Writing Programs at Williams

The Writing Workshop provides assistance at any stage of the writing progress, from initial brainstorm to final drafts.

Location: Sawyer Library, Rooms 305 and 302 (entrance lobby)

Schedule an appointment for in-depth assistance

Drop-in during standard hours for on-the-spot help with specific, less complex questions