Faculty Workshops, January 2016

This guide contains materials used at the workshops as well as supplemental information.

Workshop Description

We’ll hear from colleagues including Rashida Braggs, Kathryn Ringer-Hilfinger, Steve Levin, Keith McPartland and Anjuli Kolb, on some of the ways that they’ve gotten creative with non-traditional media in their courses.  We’ll hear about ways to design assignments to elicit video as responses, get an introduction to the new lightboard technology that OIT has been working on bringing on-line, and hear about some ways to use social media in classes.

Workshop Outline

10:00 - 10:30

Social Media: Using Twitter to Engage Students Outside of Class
Anjuli Kolb 

10:30 - 11:00

Engaging Students Inside and Outside of the Classroom with iPads
Kathryn Ringer-Hilfinger and Mika Hirai

11:00 - 11:15 Watch These Videos before Class
Steve Levin
11:15 - 12:00

The Joy of Khan
Keith McPartland

12:15 - 12:45

Lunch
Crafting Assignments for Student Scholarship in Forms Other Than Text Only

Rashida Braggs and Tamra Hjermstad

12:45 - 1:00

Lunch
Studio and Lightboard Technology

Social Media: Using Twitter to Engage Students Outside of Class

Anjuli will speak about using Twitter alongside “slow” and analogue methods to cultivate active reading practices in first and second year courses, as well as using Tumblr for secondary readings and related media in upper level courses. 

Engaging Students Inside and Outside of the Classroom with iPads

Kathryn will describe how and why she has used iPads in both lower and upper level Spanish language courses. She will discuss benefits to iPad use, such as its potential to increase students’ contact time with the target language and to provide quality feedback on student work. Additionally, she will offer some considerations for choosing different uses of the iPad based on her experience. Participants will view examples of how her language students have used iPads both inside and outside of the classroom. 

PowerPoint Slides

Resources

Watch These Videos before Class

The Joy of Khan

In this session Keith will demonstrate how he uses the screen capture program Snagit along with a drawing or note-taking program and a digitized stylus in problem-solving based classes like logic. One of the problems in a class like logic is the fact that looking at completely worked out problems often fails to convey to students how to go about working through the problems. Screen capture videos allow the students better access to the sequence of steps that go into solving certain sorts of problems.

There are a few things that the technique has been useful for.

  1. It allows Keith to present Khan-Academy-like examples of how to solve certain sorts of problems along with audio that explains what he is doing as he solves the problems. It also allows Keith to make videos that emphasize certain concepts that we go over in class along with examples.
  2. Rather than simply posting answers to homework problems, Keith can post short videos in which he demonstrate how to work through the homework problems.
  3. Finally, if we hook up the computer to the data projector and run the snagit program we can record both the notes and the audio during review sessions and classes. Students will then be able to look at how things were worked through in real time as opposed to just relying on static notes.

Crafting Assignments for Student Scholarship in Forms Other Than Text Only​

​In this session, Rashida K. Braggs will present on two multimedia assignments: graphic short stories in AFR 323: Comic Lives: Graphic Novels & Dangerous Histories of the African Diaspora and radio show segments in AFR 314: Groovin' the Written Word: The Role of Music in African American Literature. Rashida prefers using creative assignments for final projects, because she has found that creative non-written assignments can help students reflect in new and profound ways on course themes, make connections between the course and their own lives, and practice other communicative skills (such as oral presentation, teamwork, and time management) that may not be prioritized in written assignments.